Chevy Drives To New Places, 100-Year Old Dodge Spins Out

It’s World Series time and the Detroit Tigers are not in this race, but two American car brands from Detroit are. Chevy throws a hard slider, care of Mo’Ne Davis. Dodge, on the other hand, tosses a change up in the dirt. Dodge is celebrating 100 years of male bravado and muscle cars. Chevy, thankfully, […]

The post Chevy Drives To New Places, 100-Year Old Dodge Spins Out appeared first on AdPulp.

Advertising: Helping Parents Deal With Learning and Attention Issues

Fifteen nonprofit groups conducted research that led to a new website to help parents better understand these issues and a campaign to promote the site.



Snickers: Twisted

Advertising Agency: Latinworks, USA

Pinterest Taps Weather Channel's Eric Hadley to Oversee Agency Relations


As Pinterest prepares to ramp up its advertising business, the social network has hired a top marketer to tighten its ties with brands and agencies.

Pinterest has tapped Weather Channel Senior VP-Sales Strategy and Marketing Eric Hadley as the social network’s head of partner marketing.

Among other responsibilities, Mr. Hadley will lead Pinterest’s agency outreach organization that works with creative shops and media agencies to develop content and media-buying strategies for their clients.

Continue reading at AdAge.com

Brita Built a City out of Sugar Cubes to Show You What a Lifetime of Soda Looks Like

In the past, water filter brand Brita has targeted plastic bottles as public enemy No. 1, but now it has its sights on a new foe: Soda.

A new spot created by DDB California uses towering piles of sugar cubes to show the impact of drinking one sugary soda a day (which would be pretty a moderate intake for some families). In the ad, we see a stack of cubes illustrating a single day of cola, followed by a skyscraper modeled from a year’s sugar, ending on a cityscape built from the  221,314 sugar cubes a soda fan could consume “over an average adult lifetime.”

It’s a striking visual, one taken even further by the brand’s #ChooseWater campaign in an exhibit this week at New York’s Chelsea Market, where roughly 1 million sugar cubes (weighing 7,000 pounds) were shaped into an even larger skyline to reflect the amount consumed by a family of four over their lifetimes:

The sculpture features 28 buildings, varying in height from 2 to 7 feet. That’s one tall drink of terrifying.



Chevrolet Celebrates Little League Pitching Star Mo'ne Davis


Every weekday, we bring you the Ad Age/iSpot Hot Spots, new and trending TV commercials tracked by iSpot.tv, a company that catalogs, tags and measures activity around TV ads in real time. The New Releases here ran on TV for the first time yesterday. The Most Engaging ads are showing sustained social heat, ranked by SpotShare scores reflecting the percent of digital activity associated with each one over the past week. See the methodology here.

Among the new releases, Dodge continues its drive down Nostalgia Lane with another spot featuring its founders, the Dodge Brothers, while Vizio makes a vivid point about how captivating its ultra-HD TVs are. And Chevrolet celebrates history-making Little League pitcher Mo’ne Davis in a Spike Lee-directed spot that aired during the first game of the World Series.

As always, you can find out more about the making of the best commercials on TV at Ad Age’s Creativity.

Continue reading at AdAge.com

Barton F. Graf 9000 Creates Somber Mini-Doc for the Esquire Mentor Project

Last month, we posted on 72andSunny’s irreverent take on men becoming mentors, best embodied by the tagline “F*ck off, I’m helping.

Today, Barton F. Graf 9000 gave us the polar opposite of that effort in the second of three campaigns created in partnership with Esquire magazine, also known as the “must-read” glossy for ad creatives everywhere. It’s a very different, very serious effort.

Two names come to mind: Errol Morris and Philip Glass.

Fairly dramatic departure from the agency’s most recent work, no?

(more…)

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Survey: 80% of Premium Publishers Want to Sell Ads Based on Time


Just weeks after the Financial Times said it would begin selling digital ads based on the time for which they’re exposed to readers, a new survey shows other digital publishers are growing bullish about the tactic. The survey, from Digital Content Next, found that 80% of “premium” publishers are interested in pricing and selling their advertising inventory according to time-based metrics.

The research surveyed 25 members of Digital Content Next, formerly called the Online Publishers Association, including Conde Nast, ESPN, Forbes, Gannett, CNBC Digital, Inc. The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and Univision.

Among them, 60% are considering transacting based on time, 4% are already testing it, 8% will begin testing it in 2014 and another 8% plan to test it in 2015. Meanwhile, 20% said they’re not interested in pricing and selling their ads based on time, according to the survey.

Continue reading at AdAge.com

Yahoo Now Makes More Money From Search Ads Than Banners


After six straight quarters of overall revenue declines, Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer may have finally turned around Yahoo’s business — thanks to search advertising, not display.

Yahoo reported on Tuesday that its overall revenue grew by 1% to $1.15 billion in the third quarter to beat analysts’ estimates. That marks the first time Yahoo’s overall quarterly revenue increased over the previous year’s mark since the fourth quarter of 2012. And for the first time Yahoo (somewhat) reported its mobile revenue, which the company said was north of $200 million for the quarter. But those weren’t the only firsts under Ms. Mayer that Yahoo marked on Tuesday.

For the first time since the former Google exec became CEO in July 2012, Yahoo now makes more money from search advertising than it does display ads.

Continue reading at AdAge.com

Survey: 80% of Premium Publishers Want to Sell Ads Based on Time


Just weeks after the Financial Times said it would begin selling digital ads based on the time for which they’re exposed to readers, a new survey shows other digital publishers are growing bullish about the tactic. The survey, from Digital Content Next, found that 80% of “premium” publishers are interested in pricing and selling their advertising inventory according to time-based metrics.

The research surveyed 25 members of Digital Content Next, formerly called the Online Publishers Association, including Conde Nast, ESPN, Forbes, Gannett, CNBC Digital, Inc. The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and Univision.

Among them, 60% are considering transacting based on time, 4% are already testing it, 8% will begin testing it in 2014 and another 8% plan to test it in 2015. Meanwhile, 20% said they’re not interested in pricing and selling their ads based on time, according to the survey.

Continue reading at AdAge.com

Taylor Swift’s ‘1989’ Carries High Hopes but No Country Music

The music industry eagerly awaits the first-week sales of Taylor Swift’s new album, “1989,” as CD sales continue to slump, and Ms. Swift moves farther away from country music.



Unbuttoned: The Branding of Julian Assange

WikiLeaks now has a commercial arm with licensing deals around the world.



Wednesday Odds and Ends

-PFK launches first-ever digital campaign for Edmunds.com, entitled “The Absurdity of Haggling” (video above).

-Pereira & O’Dell named Matt Herrmann as its chief strategy officer. Herrmann joins from BBDO SF, where he served as EVP/director of strategy for four years.

-The Advertising Club of New York named Dana Anderson, SVP, CMO, Mondelez International as its 2014 Advertising Person of the Year.

-Saatchi & Saatchi, New York given expanded role for Walmart, tasked with presenting retail giant as underdog.

-Interpublic Group reports its net income nearly doubled in third quarter.

-Publicis North America Chief Digital Officer Dawn Winchester today announced the appointment of Eric Green as EVP, director of experience design, effective October 29, 2014.

-Mashable signs partnership with MEC, licensing its Velocity platform, “a technology that predicts and tracks the viral life cycle of digital media content.”

-Production company Über Content announced the addition Bethany MacMillan as director of East Coast sales.

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Google's New Email App Won't Have Ads, Will Bundle Brands' Emails


Google released a new email app called Inbox on Wednesday that can best be described as Gmail-lite.

Intended to be less time-consuming than Google’s original email service, Inbox borrows some of Gmail’s features like prioritizing important messages and leaves out others, like ads.

“The team is focused on developing the product, and there are no ads in Inbox right now,” said a Google spokeswoman in an email.

Continue reading at AdAge.com

Porque o legado cultural da BBC não tem nada a ver com Elton John vestindo um paletó cheio de borboletas

Na minha coluna passada muita gente bateu de frente comigo porque eu desanquei o clipe com a versão de “God Only Knows” dos Beach Boys que a BBC fez para lançar seu novo portal de música, BBC Music. Uns me acusaram de saudosista por comparar com outro clipe, um pouco menos brega, que a emissora estatal britânica fez há 17 anos. Outros simplesmente discordaram porque gostaram do clipe e acharam que eu não podia achar o clipe brega. Uns poucos partiram pro ataque pessoal, essa arrogância agressiva é o que move as ondas das redes sociais.

Vou explicar: o clipe não é ruim. Ele é todo bem produzido, direção de arte caprichada, boa escolha de música e um bom elenco de intérpretes. Mas imagine se a Apple fosse a empresa que lançasse esse comercial? Todo esse panteão rococó destoaria drasticamente da imagem cool e minimalista que é a alma da imagem da empresa de Steve Jobs. Consegue imaginar o Spotify ou o próprio YouTube se vendendo dessa forma, com essa estética? É uma estética que tem mais a ver com a imagem que as grandes gravadoras gostam de passar, essa sensação de que todos os artistas estão juntos cantando uma mesma canção, com efeitos especiais sofisticados e que demonstrem uma certa sensibilidade.

A British Broadcasting Corporation, fundada em 1922, é um ícone britânico tão importante quanto a família real, o ônibus, os policiais, a cabine telefônica, o Big Ben, os Beatles e Harry Potter

O problema do clipe, na minha opinião, é seu excesso visual. É um apuro visual caro à Hollywood, à direção de arte exagerada dos filmes de Tim Burton, dos filmes que George Lucas fez de Guerra nas Estrelas na virada do milênio, da Asgard dos estúdios Marvel. Reunir vários artistas para cantar um clássico dos Beach Boys não é nada risível quanto ver um tigre saltando sobre o piano de cauda tocado por Brian Wilson, que se apresenta num palco de frente à orquestra que toca entre abajures que piscam. Sério que você não achou brega aqueles diamantes voando ao redor de Stevie Wonder?

Não é essa a imagem que a BBC nos passa. A British Broadcasting Corporation, fundada em 1922, é um ícone britânico tão importante quanto a família real, o ônibus de dois andares, os policiais, a cabine telefônica, o Big Ben, os Beatles e Harry Potter. A estatal é um poço de conhecimento, uma biblioteca multimídia do século 20, que produz jornalismo e entretenimento com uma qualidade tão célebre quanto seu nome. Pouquíssimas empresas têm um nível de exigência tão alto quanto a BBC – e não estou falando apenas de empresas de comunicação.

BBC

Toda uma fleuma, polidez e austeridade típicas do que se reconhece como essências da cultura britânica também são qualidades da emissora

Essa excelência se traduz esteticamente. Toda uma fleuma, polidez e austeridade típicas do que se reconhece como essências da cultura britânica também são qualidades da emissora, que reforça essa imagem que o Reino Unido quer passar para o resto do mundo. Na BBC isso se traduz com uma paleta de cores contida, um minimalismo nas fontes, a sobriedade e a clareza nas expressões, tudo mínimo e comedido mesmo em seus espasmos de loucura (que não são poucos).

É vasto o legado cultural da emissora, que reúne as célebres BBC Sessions com os maiores nomes da história do pop mundial, os documentários de Adam Curtis e David Attenborough, comédias impagáveis como “Absolutely Fabulous”, “The Young Ones”, “Little Britain”, “Fawlty Towers”, “Coupling”, “Monty Python”, “Spaced”, “The Office” e “The IT Crowd”, programas musicais como o “Old Grey Whistle Test”, “Top of the Pops” e “Later with Jools Holland”, séries clássicas como “Life on Mars”, “The Hour”, “Black Mirror”, “Torchwood”, “Doctor Who”, “Skins” e “Sherlock”. Você não precisa ter visto todos esses programas para saber de sua relevância – e também para ter uma idéia do alto padrão estabelecido pela emissora britânica.

BBC

Em se tratando apenas de música, basta falar da importância de um único homem – John Peel. Morto há dez anos, Peel é praticamente um totem à importância da BBC como visionária musical. Por trinta anos DJ da emissora, ele ergueu as bandeiras da psicodelia, do rock progressivo, do rock de garagem, do punk rock, do reggae, do hardcore, da new wave, do pós-punk, da música eletrônica e do indie antes que todo mundo começasse a prestar atenção nos artistas destes gêneros, usando sua prestigiada posição de radialista de uma das principais emissoras de rádio do mundo não para impor regras ou determinar padrões musicais – ele era um farol que buscava o que a contemporaneidade parecia não ver, apontando saudáveis rupturas ao status quo musical.

Suas Peel Sessions reuniram os momentos clássicos de artistas vivendo seus respectivos auges – do Superchunk ao Supertramp, David Bowie e Pixies, Pink Floyd com Syd Barrett e Joy Division, Jimi Hendrix e Nirvana, Peel gravou com todo mundo. Foram 4 mil sessões com mais de dois mil artistas diferentes.

Sua importância é lembrada anualmente pela própria emissora desde 2011, quando a BBC resolveu estender sua participação no evento Radio Festival ao inaugurar a BBC Music John Peel Lecture, uma masterclass em que um nome importante da música lembre de aspectos relacionados à liberdade criativa que Peel tinha na emissora.

O evento acontece todo ano na University of Salford, em Manchester, na Inglaterra, e celebra a cultura do rádio e das transmissões de áudio. A primeira John Peel Lecture, em 2011, foi ministrada pelo fundador do The Who, o guitarrista e vocalista Pete Townshend. A deste ano foi dada por ninguém menos que Iggy Pop, no último dia 13 deste mês.

BBC

Foi a primeira palestra que Iggy Pop deu na vida – e o mero convite à palestra é outra amostra do grau de risco que a BBC gosta de correr. Iggy Pop é uma lenda do rock por ter inventado o punk rock bem antes deste ter esse nome, quando numa cidadezinha no subúrbio de Detroit, juntou com uns malucos no final dos anos 60 para tentar imitar o Doors e pariu dois dos discos mais barulhentos da história do rock, The Stooges (nome que também batizava sua banda) e Funhouse.

A BBC é uma emissora que coloca o maior delinquente da história do rock para dar uma palestra sobre música de graça no sistema capitalista

Desde então seu nome esteve envolvido em bastidores clássicos do rock e situações de perigo extremo sempre envolvendo álcool, sexo, drogas, violência e barulho. Iggy Pop quebrava garrafas no palco e rolava no chão enquanto cantava, saía na porrada com fãs durante os shows, passou algumas décadas – os anos 60, 70 e 80 – sem estar sóbrio. Hoje, quase 50 anos depois daquele tempo, Iggy especializou-se em ser uma lenda viva do rock, fazendo coisas que nunca fez na vida a partir desse novo título. Não por acaso vem apresentando um programa semanal na própria BBC (BBC 6, todo domingo à tarde) e aceitou dar a palestra da semana passada.

Por uma hora Iggy Pop falou sobre o tema escolhido – “Música livre (ou gratuita) em uma sociedade capitalista”, numa palestra que pode ser resumida na importância de se fazer o que se gosta por gostar, nunca por dinheiro. “Se eu quiser fazer música, a esta altura da vida, prefiro fazer o que quero e de graça, que eu faço, ou pelo menos a um preço barato, que eu possa pagar. E banque isso através de outros meios, como um orçamento pra um filme ou um site de moda – já fiz os dois. Isso parece funcionar melhor para mim do que os discos corporativos de empresas de rock’n’roll que eu tenho feito. Desculpa. Se eu quisesse dinheiro, que tal vender seguros de carro?”

BBC

Na palestra Iggy falou sobre pequenas gravadoras (citando-as nominalmente como onde encontrar música boa hoje em dia – “XL, Matador, Burger, Anti, Epitaph, Mute, Rough Trade, 4AD, Sub Pop”), sobre Jack Holzman da Elektra e Richard Branson da Virgin, sobre a Vice e o Guardian, critica o U2 e a Apple a aplaude Thom Yorke e o BitTorrent, além de falar sobre o porquê de ouvirmos tanta música ruim no rádio. A palestra dada no Quays Theatre da University of Salford pode ser ouvida em streaming por quatro semanas neste link, baixada neste outro link e a transcrição se encontra neste link (se alguém quiser se aventurar à tradução, basta postá-la nos comentários).

Resumo da ópera: a BBC é uma emissora que coloca o maior delinquente da história do rock para dar uma palestra sobre música de graça no sistema capitalista dentro de uma aula magna em homenagem a um ex-funcionário especialista em descobrir músicas que as pessoas iriam ouvir no futuro. E o que se ouve é uma hora de pensamento articulado, claro, bem humorado, mesmo quando quer chocar. Nada a ver com Elton John vestindo um paletó cheio de borboletas vivas.

Brainstorm9Post originalmente publicado no Brainstorm #9
Twitter | Facebook | Contato | Anuncie

Air New Zealand Returns to Middle Earth with ‘The Most Epic Safety Video Ever Made’ from True

Air New Zealand, no stranger to well-publicized safety videos, is today launching “The Most Epic Safety Video Ever Made,” created by agency True and directed by Kiwi filmmaker Taika Waititi, in anticipation of the December release of The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies

The airline has been cashing in on the popularity of Peter Jackson‘s Tolkien adaptations since his Lord of The Rings trilogy, and this latest installment marks the third themed effort for The Hobbit series (less than a year after the last campaign), and the second flight safety video. Shot over the course of six days, at numerous locations used in the filming of the series, the spot also includes appearances from Elijah Wood (Frodo Baggins), Dean O’Gorman (Fili the Dwarf) and Sylvester McCoy (Radagast), as well as Jackson himself. As cheesy as might be expected, the ad will undoubtedly appeal to the kind of diehard Tolkien/Jackson fans who would plan a trip to New Zealand based around the films. It’s a much more sure bet than the controversial “Safety in Paradise” from earlier this year, as Middle Earth tourism has been a boon for New Zealand.

Director Peter Jackson was pleased with the video, saying, “Air New Zealand has created yet another fantastic video to celebrate The Hobbit films. This latest offering combines members of our cast and our locations with Air New Zealand’s unique personality.  I had a lot of fun on the set with Taika and the team and look forward to seeing the video on board.”

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

3D Patterned Alphabet

Angélica Porfirio est une apprentie designer brésilienne qui manie avec brio l’art de la 3D. Elle présente un alphabet dont la structure en bois est tapissée par endroit de revêtements à motifs psychédéliques. Le traitement technique et esthétique de sa typographie donne un rendu très réaliste à son travail qui est à découvrir dans la galerie.

3D Patterned Alphabet-Z
3D Patterned Alphabet-Y
3D Patterned Alphabet-X
3D Patterned Alphabet-W
3D Patterned Alphabet-V
3D Patterned Alphabet-U
3D Patterned Alphabet-T
3D Patterned Alphabet-S
3D Patterned Alphabet-R
3D Patterned Alphabet-Q
3D Patterned Alphabet-P
3D Patterned Alphabet-O
3D Patterned Alphabet-N
3D Patterned Alphabet-M
3D Patterned Alphabet-L
3D Patterned Alphabet-K
3D Patterned Alphabet-J
3D Patterned Alphabet-I
3D Patterned Alphabet-H
3D Patterned Alphabet-G
3D Patterned Alphabet-F
3D Patterned Alphabet-E
3D Patterned Alphabet-D
3D Patterned Alphabet-C
3D Patterned Alphabet-B
3D Patterned Alphabet-A

Meat Fight: Nunchakus

Advertising Agency: Johnson & Sekin, Dallas, USA
Creative Director: Clint Carter
Art Director: Clint Martin
Copywriter: Krista Hogg
Photographer: Darren Braun
Design Director: Shannon Phillips
Account Director: Mike Stopper
Account Executive: Kat Rogers
Published: October 2014

Meat Fight: Punching bag

Advertising Agency: Johnson & Sekin, Dallas, USA
Creative Director: Clint Carter
Art Director: Clint Martin
Copywriter: Krista Hogg
Photographer: Darren Braun
Design Director: Shannon Phillips
Account Director: Mike Stopper
Account Executive: Kat Rogers
Published: October 2014

Meat Fight: Sauce

Advertising Agency: Johnson & Sekin, Dallas, USA
Creative Director: Clint Carter
Art Director: Clint Martin
Copywriter: Krista Hogg
Photographer: Darren Braun
Design Director: Shannon Phillips
Account Director: Mike Stopper
Account Executive: Kat Rogers
Published: October 2014